Next Phase of Sam Dastyari’s Rehabilitation Program: A Light-Hearted Book

Sam Dastyari is a politician who loves the limelight, more specifically he loves virtue signaling on social justice issues and getting triggered by the evil far right. It’s almost as if he thinks we have forgotten the fact that he was forced to resign only six months ago, for accepting a donation from a Chinese company. This was coupled with the fact that he defended China’s territorial claim in the south China sea against Labor policy. It would appear the Labor Party also thinks we have forgotten this scandal as they recently promoted him to Deputy Opposition Whip in the Senate. Dastyari before he came into the parliament was a Labor powerbroker, so it was clear he wasn’t going to be sidelined for long.

This year Sam has stepped up his social media presence, producing videos railing against the alleged villains of our society. From the CEOs of the big banks, to Pauline Hanson and her party’s candidates, social conservatives within the government and the Fair Work penalty rates decision, Sam makes sure he takes the moral high ground and shows how compassionate and virtuous he is. Sam doesn’t mind stretching the truth every now and then by pretending he is still a Muslim and a citizen of Iran to generate political attention. Let’s not get started on the inconsistencies of his political positions which have been exposed elsewhere.

He probably thinks his political rehabilitation is almost complete, as The Thick of It called it his strategic resignation seemed to do the trick. For the final phase of his rehabilitation program is the publication of a light-hearted book. Sam announced that he was working on this months ago, but now it is available for pre-order and has a name. Published by Melbourne University Press it is called One Halal of a Story. He obviously chose this title to troll the right and the cover features a goofy photo of him with what looks like a halal snack pack.

The description for the book paints the picture of Sam as not a hard-noised brutal political machine man but as a charming ordinary guy, it reads ‘’As in life, Sam Dastyari’s memoir is unexpected and unorthodox. ‘This is the man who introduced Pauline Hanson to the halal snack pack and accountability to big banks.’ Further adding ‘Sam brings his super-charged approach to life to his writing and the result is hilarious: part-memoir, part-political treatise and part-reflection on hard times.’ For those of us who know who Sam really is, reading this book would clearly be a painful experience, but no doubt there will be plenty of lefties who will eat up what he has to say.

Melbourne University Press was once Australia’s premier political book publisher as its previous authors include Tony Abbott, Peter Reith, Paul Kelly and Peter Costello. This year pretty much all of their books are from the far left. We previously reported on the fact they are the publisher of Waleed Aly’s wife Susan Carland’s book Fighting Hislam. Their other titles include a book by Chloe Shorten, Bill Shorten’s wife and a book by Bill Shorten’s mother in law, former Governor General of Australia Quentin Bryce. There are books on left wing political issues including the history of the Transport Workers Union, on George Pell’s controversies and a pro-euthanasia book. It is unclear whether this lurch to the left is because of the bias of the publisher themselves or a commercial decision, but it is still a sad state when it appears less conservative books are being published by such a major player in book publishing.

While the mainstream media and Labor have clearly given Dastyari only a short time in the sin bin it is clear the rest of us should continue to hold him to account and to expose his tricky political tactics. It is obvious that if Sam was a conservative politician his career would be over, just look at what happened to Sussan Ley. But if you are in the left then as long as you have the correct views your misdemeanors can be excused. But we are not fooled by this act he is putting on and we can probably assume with confidence that it won’t be long until Sam finds himself in trouble yet again. This book to anyone not blinded by partisan politics should view it as a shallow profile puffing exercise.