The Unshackled Waves Ep. 52 French Presidential Election Result, the Federal Budget and Labor’s Australia First Ad

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On this week’s review show we are joined once again by Co-Editor in Chief of The Unshackled Sukith Fernando. It was a week of big political events starting with second round of voting for the French Presidential Election. The election of globalist Emmanuel Macron over nationalist Marine Le Pen was disappointing, we explain the factors of why she lost and  how the nationalist movement faces stronger resistance in continental Europe than it did in US and UK last year. We highlight that not all hope is lost with the strong youth vote for Le Pen and express our hope that if France still exists by the time of the next election in 2022 a nationalist candidate can prevail.

We analyze the 2017 Australia federal budget handed down this week and despair at the fact it appears to be Labor budget delivered by a so called conservative government. We note that this budget contains numerous tax and spending increases which any economist will tell you is not the path to surplus or prosperity. We do however highlight some of the good measures such as random drug testing of welfare recipients and the cuts to foreign aid. However overall we conclude that this was a budget from a government which had no political courage and was more interested in pleasing special interest groups.

We also comment on Bill Shorten’s ill-fated Australia First ad as it was criticized by the left for being racist as it contained too many white people. We explain why the left with its support for multiculturalism, higher refugee intakes and open borders cannot successfully convince the voters they want to put Australian jobs first. We also comment on the reactions of some conservatives such as Cory Bernardi taking the opportunity to call the left racist and whether that is a good strategy.

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