If You’re Unsure, Vote No

Australian Politics, Free Speech, LGBT, Marriage, Religion, Rundown

If you are unsure about the threats to liberty, vote no. There are two main reasons why you should vote no, those being; Redefining marriage will threaten freedom of speech and redefining marriage can take away religious freedom.

So how will redefining marriage threaten your freedom of speech?

One of the most egregious and intolerant attacks seen by the ‘yes’ vote occurred this earlier this week. An 18-year-old Christian nanny was sacked for ‘coming out’ against homosexual marriage, and she says there are many other young people who share her views but are too afraid to speak out, due to intimidation, bullying and possible sacking – such as that experienced by Madeline.

Madeline was “let go” from a Canberra entertainment company Capital Kids Parties over the weekend after she changed her Facebook profile image to a Coalition for Marriage filter saying, “It’s OK to vote no”.

Business owner Madlin Sims messaged her privately to express her disappointment, before blocking her and posting a public message about the incident in a disgusting attempt to virtue signal which quickly went viral. “Today I fired a staff member who made it public knowledge that they feel “it’s okay to vote no’’.

A vote for same sex marriage, without protections to freedom of speech, is a dangerous vote that could lead to your liberties being eroded, and your religious convictions being labelled as ‘bigotry’, or hate speech.

Remember, in the age of intersectionality, your words are directly correlated with violence. And that is why the militant, and intolerant Marxist movement is keen to supress your right to freedom of speech, and they are doing that through this gay marriage bill/vote (through fining ‘hate speech’ $12,600) and the Australian Human Rights Commission. A body that that left has used to attack free speech before, as seen with the Bill Leak case.

The business owner said:

So how could redefining marriage take away religious freedom?

The palpable challenge to religious freedom is grave and you can see it coming. The Catholic Archbishop of Hobart circulated an entirely respectful pamphlet – ‘Don’t Mess with Marriage’ — and Tasmania’s Anti-Discrimination Commission agreed to hear a complaint against him.

The complaint was eventually withdrawn, which was a tactical decision. But the principle of the complaint is clear. Simply asserting classical Judeo-Christian doctrine is an offence in the eyes of the totalitarian, lawyer activist class that is increasingly dominant in the poisonous age of identity politics.

Moreover, internationally we can see how Same-Sex Marriage has eroded religious liberty.

The Speaker of the British House of Commons has proclaimed “Proper equal marriage” won’t happen until the churches are compelled to obey by law. So that begs the question, will the militant LGBT lobby stop at so called ‘marriage equality’ or will they try and compel people of faith to perform tasks that go against their firmly held religious convictions?

Alongside the madness seen in Britain, Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said his party was working towards compelling priests to perform same-sex weddings.

Concerns about how redefining marriage will affect your religious freedom extend far beyond whether an individual minister of religion or celebrant is required to solemnise a same-sex wedding.

It will impact what faith leaders will be able to preach, what schools and parents will be able to teach children, and how Australians will be able to conduct their businesses in accordance with their beliefs (they may be forced to provide gay wedding cakes, or service gay weddings even if that is against their religious convictions).

For me it is simple, there is a lot at stake, and if you’re unsure what redefining marriage will do to free speech and religious liberty, vote no.