The Unshackled Waves Ep. 47 UK Snap Election, Turnbull on Immigration and French Presidential Election Preview

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On our second catch-up review show for the week we are joined once again by Co-Editor in Chief of The Unshackled Sukith Fernando. We start with the stunning news that British Prime Minister Theresa May has called a snap general election for June 8th. We highlight that despite its risks it was the right decision by Theresa May to ensure that the Conservatives have larger majority (which polling indicates they will obtain) in the House of Commons that they can command when going through the Brexit negotiations. It is also the right thing for her to seek her own mandate as Prime Minister since she is currently unelected and would be undemocratic for her not to face an election until 2020.

We discuss Malcolm Turnbull deciding to get tough on immigration this week. This began with his announcement that the government would be abolishing and replacing the 457 foreign visa worker program. It was followed later in the week by Turnbull proposing a new Australia values citizenship test along with an English language test and citizens having a work requirement. We agree this is a step in the right direction but still does not address our key area of concern which is Muslim immigration, but this change in direction from Turnbull is a sign that we are winning and need to keep up the pressure on our leaders.

We also preview the French Presidential Election for which the first round of voting will be on April 23rd, followed by a run off on May 7th. We run through the prospective candidates and their policies, but highlight that National Front Leader Marine Le Pen is the obvious choice for anyone concerned with the future of France. It is a nation which is suffering economically and culturally and Le Pen’s policies are the only ones that can rescue France. We concede that although she will most likely win the first round, in the run off it will be difficult for her to win.

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